Code-Switching and Code Mixing in the Selected Tracks of the Hip Hop Music of Flavour and 9ice

Authors

  • Balogun Sarah Department of English, Federal College of Education, Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria
  • Murana Muniru Oladayo Department of European Languages, Federal University Birnin-Kebbi, Kebbi State, Nigeria

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47631/ijecls.v2i3.255

Keywords:

Code-switching, Hip Hop Music, Pidgin, Plurality

Abstract

This article attempts a comparative analysis of code-switching and code-mixing in the Nigerian music industry, using the lyrics of Flavour and 9ice as a case study. Although the English language is the national language in Nigeria and the language used by most of the musicians for the composition of their songs, and due to the linguistic plurality of Nigeria, most of these musicians tend to lace their songs chunks of words and phrases from their mother tongue or at least one of the three major languages in Nigeria, which are Hausa, Igbo, and Yoruba. The Markedness Model by Myers-Scotton (1993) is used as the framework to interrogate the switching and mixing in the codes used by these selected musicians and we find that while most code-switching is done in three languages – English, Nigerian Pidgin and the artist’ first language (mother tongue)  – their mother tongue plays the prominent role. Code-switching or code-mixing in these songs, therefore, becomes a depiction of the Nigerian state with its diverse languages and it provides the links between the literates and the illiterates thereby giving the artiste the popularity desired. The study concludes that the unique identity created by code-switching and code-mixing in the Nigerian music industry has a positive influence on music lovers, helping artists to achieve wide patronage and reflecting the ethnolinguistic diversity of the Nigerian nation.

Downloads

Published

2021-05-02

How to Cite

Sarah, B. ., & Oladayo , M. M. . (2021). Code-Switching and Code Mixing in the Selected Tracks of the Hip Hop Music of Flavour and 9ice. International Journal of English and Comparative Literary Studies , 2(3), 55-70. https://doi.org/10.47631/ijecls.v2i3.255